There’s a lot of debate in the Python community about whether it’s better to use the append() or extend() methods when working with lists.

In this article, we’ll take a look at both of these methods and see how they differ. We’ll also see how to use each of them in some common scenarios. So, which method should you use? Let’s find out!

What is an extension in Python and what are the benefits of using one over a normal function or method call

Extensions in Python are a way of adding functionality to a class or object without having to modify the source code. This can be useful if you’re working with third-party code that you don’t have control over, or if you want to add features to an existing object without changing the underlying implementation.

There are two main benefits to using extensions:

  • They’re more flexible than normal function or method calls.
  • They’re easier to write and maintain than modifying the source code of a class or object.

python extend vs append

When you’re working with lists in Python, there are two main ways of adding items to the list: append() and extend(). The difference between these two methods is that: append() adds an item to the end of a list. extend() adds items from another list (or any iterable) to the end of the list.

So, which one should you use? The answer depends on what you’re trying to do. If you’re just adding a single item to the end of a list, then append() is usually the better choice. It’s simpler and more efficient than extend(). However, if you’re adding multiple items (or if you’re adding items from another list), then extend() is usually the better choice. It’s more convenient than append(), and it doesn’t require you to create a new list.

Which is better for performance – append or extend

There’s no clear winner when it comes to performance. Both append() and extend() are O(1) operations, which means they’re both very fast. In most cases, the performance difference will be negligible. However, there is one scenario where extend() is significantly faster than append(): when you’re adding items from another list. This is because extend() can add multiple items at once, whereas append() can only add one item at a time.

For example, let’s say you have a list of 100 integers, and you want to add them to another list. If you use append(), it will take 100 iterations to add all the items. However, if you use extend(), it will only take one iteration. This is because extend() can add multiple items at once, whereas append() can only add one item at a time. So, if you’re adding items from another list, extend() is the better choice. Otherwise, there’s no clear winner.

How they work under the hood Append

Under the hood, append() is implemented as a call to the list’s extend() method. So, when you use append(), it will add the item to the end of the list.

However, there’s one key difference between append() and extend(): extend() can take multiple items as input, whereas append() can only take one. This is because extend() is implemented as a loop, which means it can add multiple items at once.

Which one is better for Python extension

There’s no clear winner when it comes to Python extensions. Both append() and extend() have their own benefits and drawbacks.

If you’re just adding a single item to the end of a list, then append() is usually the better choice. It’s simpler and more efficient than extend(). However, if you’re adding multiple items (or if you’re adding items from another list), then extend() is usually the better choice. It’s more convenient than append(), and it doesn’t require you to create a new list. Ultimately, the decision of which one to use depends on your specific needs.

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